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Adobe Photoshop - Saving

This document gives you instructions and options when saving in adobe photoshop.

Before exiting Photoshop, save project files on the computer’s hard drive or other media.

Saving files from time to time while working is a good idea, so that there is always a recent copy safely stored on a storage device.

To Save:

  1. Choose File > Save As to store a file already saved with a different name, or even a file with the same name but in a different location.
  2. Choose File > Save to store the current file with its present name, or simply update an existing file.
  3. Navigate to the folder the file should be stored in.
  4. Type a name in the File Name (Save As on the Mac) text box.
    • Select a format from the Format drop-down list (Figure 1) Some of the most commonly used files formats are:
    • Photoshop - Photoshop's native file format supports all the program's capabilities. It's usually a good idea to maintain the original image, with editable type and layers, for future use.
    • JPEG - most commonly used for full-color photographs and images with a broad range of color. The format does not support transparency.
    • Photoshop PDF - Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) is a cross-platform format that can be opened and viewed in the free Acrobat Reader, available for most computer operating systems. Photoshop PDF supports all of Photoshop's color modes, transparency, vector type and artwork, spot and alpha channels, and compression.
    • Photoshop EPS - EPS is typically used for elements to be included in a page layout or PDF document. One of the advantages of EPS as a file format is the capability of including both raster and vector data.
    • TIFF - TIFF and EPS are the two most widely accepted image formats for commercial printing. The format supports CMYK, RGB, Lab, Indexed Color, Grayscale, and Bitmap color modes. If the file contains background transparency, there is an option to save it. A TIFF file will also contain layers.
    • CompuServe GIF - reduces image size by using an indexed color palette.  Rather than allowing a full range of millions of colors it has a maximum of 256 colors, and might use even fewer. GIF files support transparency and animation.
    • PNG - Similar to a GIF, this format supports Transparency, and in some cases to a greater extent than GIF files.
      • PNG-8 - Uses 8 bits for a maximum of 256 indexed colors. File sizes are often slightly smaller than GIF. PNG-8 is often preferred over GIF.
      • PNG-24 - is more like a JPEG in that it uses 24 bits per pixel for a full range of color possibilities. It also supports full alpha-channel transparency. File sizes are much larger, so this format should be used sparingly. In cases where full-alpha transparency is required, this is the format of choice.
  5. Click Save to store the image

Saving for Web

A graphic or photo is properly ready for the web if it’s resolution is 72 dpi, color mode is RGB, and generally reduced in file size for faster loading web pages.

VIDEO

To Achieve this, go to File > Save for Web.

  1. Click on the 2-Up tab at the top of the Save for Web dialogue box.
    • The top image is the original the bottom is what the saved file will look like. Use this for quality comparison.
    • In the preview, the image and the file size is shown below the image.
  2. Under the format drop down menu, there is the option to choose GIF, JPEG, PNG-8, PNG-24 or WBMP
    • GIF - reduces image size by using an indexed color palette.  Rather than allowing a full range of millions of colors it has a maximum of 256 colors, and might use even fewer. GIF files support transparency and animation.
    • JPEG - most commonly used for full-color photographs and images with a broad range of color. The format does not support transparency.
    • PNG - Similar to a GIF, this format supports Transparency, and in some cases to a greater extent than GIF files.

    • PNG-8 - Uses 8 bits for a maximum of 256 indexed colors. File sizes are often slightly smaller than GIF. PNG-8 is often preferred over GIF.
    • PNG-24 - is more like a JPEG in that it uses 24 bits per pixel for a full range of color possibilities. It also supports full alpha-channel transparency. File sizes are much larger, so this format should be used sparingly. In cases where full-alpha transparency is required, this is the format of choice.
    • WBMP - The Windows Bit Map format (BMP) is not not well compressed and really should be avoided unless it’s necessary for a specific use.
3.Choose a file format that fits the needs of the project.
4.Choose a quality level for jpg or number of colors for gif.
5.Keep Convert to sRGB checked if the image will be posted to the web.
6.Choose to include or leave out Copyright and Contact Info.
7.Resize the image if necessary
8.Choose a location for the file on a storage device.
9.Click Save.

When Save for Web is used, Photoshop saves off a copy of the document. And when it's finished saving, it returns back to the image that was being modified and leaves that master, layered file untouched. So when trying to make the smallest file possible for sharing, use Photoshop Save For Web command.


If you need further assistance please contact the Information Technology Help Desk at 920-424-3020 or helpdesk@uwosh.edu




Keywords:ps, "Saving for Web", pdf, tiff, jpeg, GIF, png   Doc ID:64256
Owner:Aarron V.Group:UW Oshkosh
Created:2016-06-20 09:22 CDTUpdated:2016-06-21 15:19 CDT
Sites:UW Oshkosh
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